Vaporizable Electronics

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Vaporizable Electronics

A new method for remotely vaporizing electronics has been developed by engineers from Cornell University and Honeywell Aerospace.

This newly developed technology is being developed to remotely vaporize materials, such as microchips and memory storage device. In turn provides its user power to remotely destroy a memory bank, along with the valuable data stored within them.

The workings of the innovative self-destruction lie within the design. Incorporated into the electronic is a silicon-dioxide microchip attached to a polycarbonate shell that stores rubidium and sodium bifluoride. A radio signal can then be used to open graphene-on-nitride valves, releasing the stored chemicals, and effectively causes a chemical reaction that renders the device non-existent. This chemical reaction does not create any environmentally hazardous materials. The concept of self-destructing electronic devices is not novel, yet, this is the most revolutionary and innovative adaptation of the technology seen so far.

"There are a number of existing techniques for triggering the vaporization, each with inherent drawbacks. Some transient electronics use soluble conductors that dissolve when contacted by water, requiring the presence of moisture. Others disintegrate when they reach a specific temperature, requiring a heating element and power source to be attached.

Cornell engineers have created a transient architecture that evades these drawbacks by using a silicon-dioxide microchip attached to a polycarbonate shell. Hidden within the shell are microscopic cavities filled with rubidium and sodium biflouride – chemicals that can thermally react and decompose the microchip."

The construction industry is reliant on technology, and as such data breaches are one of the major concerns for small to large construction companies. This new and innovative technology can solve hardships such as preserving the integrity of confidential information; for instance, self-destructing a device that is storing valuable architectural drawings and specifications. Additionally, it can help construction companies protect the integrity of information related to their employees, legal documents, etc. It is also not hard to imagine the circumstance of an employee losing a company owned device which stores sensitive financial data relating to proprietary assets and bank accounts. This technology would allow the company, then, to remotely destroy the memory of a device to protect the information it is storing.

For more information on the vaporizable electronics, please visit Engineers Create New Architecture for Vaporizable Electronics.

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